• The Black Caller

Today, I am a cold caller

Welcome back, second-time reader! (and if you have read my blogs more than twice, then thank you, don't stop!) Now, this blog is more personal rather than work, but today we will be talking about all the work that I have done in my life, and what the role is, what was expected of me during that time and what were the perks and cons of those jobs. Now, this can help you understand a bit of what happens when you work for people in that specific business and I know Youtube does have a lot of better tutorials and explanations, but time and time again I believe that we should all sit down and read.


Let's begin...



  1. College Journalist - now, my love for words began when I met Harry Potter, but that is a story for another day. I got hired by my college to join a group of writers. We do reports, features, news, travel, essays, poems, and short stories among many others. I say this is work, but its more - fun. We had built a strong friendship over the four years I was there making all those late-night edits, photoshoots, back and forth to the printing house until publishing day.

Perks:

a. 50% off on student fees

b. Travels and food

c. Paid journalism seminars

d. Free use of office supplies: computer, bond papers, printing, camera, etc


Pitfalls:

a. The late nights of editing

b. The pressure of meeting deadlines



2. Business Process Outsourcing Agent - ten days after I graduated, I got hired to work for a call center whose client was a huge cellphone company in the US. Over the course of two years and a half, I worked for two call centers before I got promoted. I loved the job because I loved talking - practicing my English was one thing, earning from it was another! It definitely was the time where I absolutely went crazy!


Perks:

a. High salary, with bonuses and commissions for a job well done!

b. Air-conditioned office, free water, and coffee to your heart's desire

c. Office parties with lots of raffles


Pitfalls:

a. Graveyard shifts, hard transportation at night

b. Difficult/Long promotions due to politics

c. Short sleeping hours, forgetting the day of the week




3. Sales Coach/Team Leader - the role was pretty much self-explanatory: you are given a number of agents to lead and coach in a certain department to help improve the ratings, numbers, or sales of that company. You need to be pretty versed with excel, word, PowerPoint, and have strong email etiquette. A team leader should have personable skills and should always be approachable. They should be both team and individual players - I say individual players because sometimes when you are the only TL on a weekend you need to be able to make hard decisions on your own. As a Team Leader, I learned that there are different ways to approach an agent - not everyone has the same personality, so you need to tread lightly and figure out how to talk to a person so you don't hurt their feelings and so on. I would say the years I have worked as a Team Leader were the worst/lowest parts of my personal and financial life. I am not a big fan of myself during those days, and I am glad it is over for me. But for others, this can be a rewarding and thrilling life - the fact that you inspire and coach people to become better agents, better phone handlers, and ensuring that they are employed and continue to help their family is very rewarding indeed.


Perks:

a. High salary, with bonuses and commissions for a job well done!

b. Air-conditioned office, free water, and coffee to your heart's desire

c. Office parties with lots of raffles


Pitfalls:

a. Graveyard shifts, hard transportation at night

b. Difficult/Long promotions due to politics

c. Short sleeping hours, forgetting the day of the week






4. Inside Sales Associate (home-based) - when you are an ISA, you are 101% working for a real estate agent or agency. Now, your role here is to make inbound, outbound, and nurture calls until the agent closes the deal with the lead. Any new lead coming into their website needs to be called by you, and every incoming call inquiring about a certain property needs to be answered by you. I love working as an ISA because it's super easy and the money is big when a deal closes!


You have to know these following information:


a. What is the address (if they found a home they like and want to schedule a showing/tour) and when do they want to do the tour


b. Should there be no address, you need to know their:

* Preferred location/favorite cities in the State they might want to live in

* How many bedrooms and bathrooms do they want

* Are they looking to live in a residential, a condo, a townhouse, a mobile home, or are they only looking to just purchase a lot instead?

* When do they see themselves getting their dream home? (Timeline!)

* What is their budget

* Are they ready to purchase when a right home comes along? (Are they pre-approved for a home loan, do they want to pay cash or do they need help with their credit?)

* House must-haves: do they want a garage, a pool, a basement, are they looking to live in a modern home, or maybe an antique house?


c. When are they free to meet - now, some agents prefer to meet with their leads if they are already pre-approved or ready to buy anytime... while others want to meet anyone who would either buy or sell a home. A quick meet and greet happen, where we start to build value for this client. Our goal is to get the client to meet with our real estate agent for a quick cup of coffee, or a quick conversation over an agreed-upon location. As the appointment setter, you need to be warm on the ears, friendly, and accomodating with their questions and don't sound too aggressive!


Perks:

a. High salary, with bonuses and commissions for a closed deal

b. Most real estate agents are very nice to work with

c. Free training to help enhance your skills as a salesperson

d. Weekly/bi-weekly pay


Pitfalls:

a. If real estate season is low, or no closed deals are happening you are more than likely to be replaced with a much more productive person

b. Culture gaps - some VA's or appointment setters find it hard to communicate to leads

c. For those who are not organized, it would be pretty hard to nurture your leads because there are tagging, scheduling, and filtering that needs to happen


5. Healthcare Insurance Outbound Caller (home-based) - this too, is pretty simple! Our role is to enroll leads to the insurance company of our client. So there are a lot of insurance businesses that actually need a cold caller - Medicare, Auto, Life, and Health among others. Specifically, I have worked for a T65 Medicare Campaign. It is called Turning 65, because we are calling people who will be turning 65, and asking if they already have Medicare and if not, ask them specific questions like:

  • What is their insurance right now

  • How much are they paying for it

  • What are their current conditions

  • What medications are they taking

  • Name and age of family members

The reason why we ask their current condition is that for those who usually have any heart conditions, had a stroke in the past, have cancer or any major surgeries in the last couple of months fall under a different campaign and therefore can't be prequalified for the T65, now see here things could have changed since the last time I have worked for this campaign was January 2018, but that was the meat of the call. The cold caller will then set a phone appointment or a live transfer to the insurance agent so that they can answer specific questions that the cold caller is not authorized by law to explain.


Perks:

a. Easy dialing system

b. Very easy script

c. Usually weekly pay


Pitfalls:

a. Certain questions can't be answered by the cold caller

b. Since we are speaking with senior citizens, there is a tendency to have a longer conversation because we will usually have to repeat ourselves for them

c. If you don't perform or send in quality leads, you are most likely to be replaced


6. Real Estate Investor Cold Caller (home-based) - my favorite work of all! This one tops the bar because it is so easy you can do it in your sleep! Now, there are two types of real estate investors: the wholesalers and the flippers, I have worked with both! Wholesalers generally do not renovate the homes while flippers do - more info here: https://www.assetcolumn.com/wholesaler-vs-fixer-upper-how-they-work/-150


Here are some of the most important things that cold callers need when speaking with home-owners:

a. What is the general condition of the house

b. How long ago were the last repairs done to the house, and what repairs were those

c. How many beds and baths, what is the square feet of the house

d. Do they have mortgage balance?

e. How much do they want to sell the house for?

f. Why do they want to sell the house?


With those questions, you would be able to figure out if a lead is super hot or not! Here is an example real estate script helpful for new cold callers to practice on:

Appointment Cold calling script A
.docx
Download DOCX • 17KB

Perks:

a. Commissions! These deals are fast and you can get commissions monthly

b. Very easy script

c. Usually weekly pay

d. Easy dialing system

e. RE Investors are usually pretty cool and nice to work with


Pitfalls:

a. Most investors offer very basic rate (not all)

b. If the leads are bad e.g wrong number, wrong person, voicemails, then there will be no conversation to close a deal

c. If you don't perform or send in quality leads, you are most likely to be replaced



Now, probably one of the best things about the work that I do is that I am not alone! I have a team of agents who know what I do, and do it right! These cold callers are rockstars with a heart - you can never go wrong with them!


That is why today, I choose to be a cold caller: because this is my God-given purpose. To teach and help moms here in my city find work that are suited for them whilst still being the best mom they can be!


Contact us today to get your cold caller!

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